East Anglian Ancestors

Norfolk & Suffolk genealogy

April 26, 2014
by Jacqui Beard
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Authors & Writers

March saw a big breakthrough in one of my family history conundrums. My great x 4 grandfather Samuel Roper married Maria Linstead in North Lopham in 1803. Disappointingly, I have been unable to find Samuel’s origin but I have finally found Maria Linstead revealing another genealogical co-incidence. I couldn’t find Maria because she had re-married, re-located & was living in Debenham in Suffolk. And the man she re-married was Samuel Last who was another of my relatives (albeit remote; a 3rd cousin six times removed). Maria’s place and date of birth was present in the 1851 census so I was able to trace her birth & several generations of ancestors. This new data is not yet on this website but will be uploaded shortly.

Which brings me to Edward Philip Basil Linstead, sixth cousin twice removed & found as a result of this new information. Edward Linstead was an author of at least 4 books, some of which can still be purchased today. A closer relative William Charles Miles was also an author & journalist according to the  1891 & 1901 census.  I am happy to join them as a newly published author, having written my first book which was published this week.  Beau Garnie & The Invisimin Mine is a book for 7 – 11 year olds and is available on Amazon Kindle and through www.lulu.com

Beau book cover

November 10, 2013
by Jacqui Beard
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Sergeant James Llewellyn Bodenham 1915 – 2013

My husband’s grandfather died earlier this year.  James Llewellyn ‘Jim’ Bodenham was born in 1915.   He joined the Army in 1941 and trained as a mechanical engineer.  From 1941 to 1945  Jim served in Belgium, Holland and Germany.  His most memorable war experience was his involvement in the removal of two starving elephants from Munster Zoo to Antwerp Zoo using a converted tank transporter.  Many years later his wife contacted Antwerp zoo to find out what happened to the two elephants.  Monty & Ike (pictured below) survived the war.  Monty died in 1957 aged 36 and Ike was nearly 60 years old when he died in 1981.

After the war, Jim served in Egypt and Palestine and was eventually demobbed becoming a greengrocer in Ramsgate, Kent.  After 6 years he moved back to Gloucester, where he remained for the rest of his life.

Jim died in Maisemore in June this year.  We remember him on this Remembrance Sunday – as we remember all those brave men & women who did not return.

“……At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them.”

November 10, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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We Will Remember Them

Between 1914 & 1918, 95 of my relatives fell in the Great War.

“They shall not grow old,
As we that are left grow old,
Age shall not weary them
Nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun
And in the morning
We will remember them.”

Laurence Binyon (1869 – 1943)

Private Francis Henry ABBS, 1st Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment, 1918, Kensington, killed in action

Leading Seaman Gilbert Alfred ABBS, Royal Navy, 1918, HMS Platypus, died of disease

Private William Herbert BALDWIN, 55th Battalion Australian infantry, 1917, Somme, France, killed in action

Private Frank James BARLEY, 6th Battalion Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Harry Albert BARLEY, 10th Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Stanley Arthur BARTON, 12/13th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Lance Corporal John Leonard BASHAM, 17th Battalion Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex Regiment), 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Arthur James BIRD, Machine Gun Corps Infantry, 1918, Salonika, died of wounds

Private Bertie BIRD, Machine Gun Corps, 1918, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Bombardier Stanley George BIRD, Royal Horse & Royal Artillery Territorial Force, 1918, Birkenhead, died of wounds

Lance Corporal Herbert Edwin BLACKBURN, Coldstream Guards, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private John William BLACKBURN, 10th Battalion Prince of Wales Own Yorkshire Regiment, 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private John Kersey BLOFIELD, 1st Battalion Hampshire Regiment, 1915, France & Flanders, killed in action

Corporal Christopher BORRETT, 4th Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1914, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Geoffrey Lionel BROOKE, 1st Battalion Worcester Regiment, 1918, Aldershot, died

Chief Stoker Vincent Keeble BULLEN, Royal Navy, 1917, Scapa Flow, Orkneys, explosion on HMS Vanguard

Private Basil Rowland BULLETT,         5th Battalion Lincolnshire Regiment, 1918, Aldershot, died of wounds

Private Ernest Benjamin BULLOCK, 2nd Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1916, Mesopotamia, killed in action in the field

Private Edgar Cyril BURTON, 8th Norfolk Battalion, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action 1st day of Battle of the Ancre

Lance Corporal Francis James BURTON, 12 Battalion Duke of Cambridge’s Own, 1916, Thiepval, killed in action

Private Reginald George BURTON, 2nd Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1916, Basra, Mesopotamia, Broncho pneumonia

Private Gilbert John BURTON, 2nd Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, 1917, Passchendaele, France, killed in action

Gunner Edmund COATES, Royal Garrison Artillery, 1917, France & Flanders, died

Lieutenant Clarence Edwards Nooth COOPER, Royal Flying Corps, 1916, Somme, France, Flying accident

Lieutenant Francis Nicholas Nooth COOPER, Army Service Corps & S W Borderers, 1917, France, missing in action

Drummer Albert Arthur COPPING, 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards 1914, France & Flanders, killed in action

Rifleman Albert James COPPING, 3rd Battalion Princes Own Rifle Battalion, 1918, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Acting Sergeant George Sydney CORBEN, 12th (Service) Sheffield Battalion, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private John Stanley CORBEN, 23rd (County of London) Battalion, 1916, Lambeth, died of wounds

Private Arthur CORBIN, 7th Battalion Queen’s (Royal West Surrey Regiment), 1918, Vendhuile, killed in action

Rifleman James William CORBIN, 17th Regiment Kings Royal Rifle Corps, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Gunner Bertie Herbert CORBYN, Royal Garrison Artillery, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Frederick CORBYN, D Company 1st Battalion Worcester Regiment, 1918, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Jonah CORBYN, 10th Battalion Queen Alexandra’s own Welsh regiment; formerly 15th Norfolk, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Major George Edmond Maurice COWELL, Royal Horse & Royal Field Artillery, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Richard Christopher COX, 1st Battalion Essex Regiment, France & Flanders, killed in action

Captain Arthur Henry Prinsep CRUICKSHANK, 32nd Pioneers, 1915, Ypres, died of wounds

Gunner Ivor Leslie CURTIS, Royal Horse & Royal Field Artillery, 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Alfred Charles CUSHING, 7th Battalion Oxfordshire & Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 1917, Salonika, killed in action

Private Gordon Walter CUSHING, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry, 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Gunner Bertie Clement DENNIS, 12th Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Edward John DENNIS, 8th Battalion Royal Berkshires, 1916, La Boudrelle, France, killed in action

Private George Robert DENNIS, 1st Battalion Cambridge Regiment, 1917, Belgium, killed in action

Private Thomas William DENNY, Coldstream Guards, 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Oscar Glyde DIXON, 7th Royal West Kent Regiment, 1918, France, killed in action

Private David DURRANT, 2nd Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1916, Mesopotamia, killed in action

Fireman & Trimmer Nelson DYBALL, Mercantile Marines, 1918, At Sea SS Westergate, torpedoed by German Sub UB-80

Private Herbert ELSEY, 2/5th (TF) Battalion, York & Lancaster Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Walter Ernest ENGLAND, 9th Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Morris Ethanuel EVERITT, 1st/4th Northumberland Fusiliers, 1916, Thiepval, killed in action

Lance Corporal Percy Gordon FAIRMAN, 12th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, 1917, Ypres, Belgium, killed in action

Private Stephen Francis FAIRMAN, Coldstream Guards, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Archibald FAIRWEATHER, 1st Battalion Cambridgeshire Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Charles FAIRWEATHER, 2nd Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Lieutenant Cyril John FAIRWEATHER, 4th Battalion Hampshire Regiment, 1914, France & Flanders, killed in action

Battery Quarter Master Sergeant Edward FAIRWEATHER, Royal Horse & Royal Field Artillery, 1916, Somme, France, died of wounds

Private Harry William FAIRWEATHER, 2nd (City of London) Battalion Royal Fusiliers, 1917, Ypres, Belgium, killed in action

Rifleman Kenneth Herbert FAIRWEATHER, D Company, 2nd/16th Battalion London Regiment Queen’s Westminster Rifles, 1917, Palestine, died

Private Percy Reeve FAIRWEATHER, 1915, 5th Battalion Suffolk Regiment, Galipoli, killed in action

Private Philip FAIRWEATHER, Gordon Highlanders, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Bertie Thomas FARROW, 8th Battalion Border Regiment, 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Ernest Richard FARROW, 6th Battalion Queens Own (Royal West Kent Regiment), 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Deckhand John William West FARROW, Mercantile Marine Motor Boat “Frigate Bird” Grimsby, 1917, Spurn Point, Sunk by German Submarine Karsten Von Heydebreck

Private Walter William FARTHING, 1st Battalion Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment, 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Corporal Albert Henry FIELD, 20th (County of London) Battalion Blackheath & Woolwich, 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Sergeant Robert William W FIELDS, 1st Battalion Border Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private William Astley FIELDS, 9th Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Lance Corporal Leslie Charles FISHER, 11 Royal Sussex Regiment, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Lieutenant Frank Henry FISON, 6th (Cyclist) Battalion (Territorial), 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Lance Corporal Benjamin Bowers GALLANT, 1st Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1915, Ypres, killed in action

Lance Corporal Gilbert GIVENS, 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own), 1918, Cambrai, died of wounds

Rifleman William Norris GIVENS, 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, 1916, Thiepval, killed in action

Private James HANNARD, 2nd Battalion Alexandra, Princess of Wales Own (Yorkshire Regiment), France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Arthur HERRINGTON, 5th Battalion Alexandra, Princess of Wales Own (Yorkshire Regiment), 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Captain Anthony May Capron HOLLIST, 1915, Buffs East Kent Regiment, Unknown, killed in action

Private John HORREX, 14th (Service) Battalion Hampshire Regiment, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Owen Albert V LUBBOCK, 9th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Sergeant Frank MANBY, Royal Garrison Artillery, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private John Cordy MANBY, 12th Battalion East Surrey Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Sergeant James Dowd MILES, 7th Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Brian Ponsonby Fitzgerald MOORE, 62nd Punjabis, 1916, At Sea, HMHS Velera, died of wounds

Private Horace Victor RACE, 2nd Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Guardsman Russell RACKHAM, 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 1914, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Joseph RAWLINSON, 2nd Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1916, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Edwin Alfred ROPER, 1st Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1918, Salonika, died

Private Herbert Charles SADLER, 8th Battalion East Surrey Regiment, 1915, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Harry SEELEY, 2nd Battalion Suffolk Regiment, 1915, France & Flanders, killed in action

Gunner Leonard Walter SEELEY, Royal Garrison Artillery, 1917, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Cecil Bertie SIMMONDS, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry), 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private Alfred Edward SQUIRRELL, 9th Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Lance Corporal Stanley Aldis SQUIRRELL, 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 1918, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Private Rebuen Stephen STONE, 7th Battalion Norfolk Regiment, 1918, France & Flanders, killed in action

Private William Wells WEST, 6th Battalion Border Regiment, France & Flanders, died of wounds

Sapper Frederick Charles WOODHOUSE, Royal Corps of Engineers, 1917, Egypt, died

 

September 22, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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Drury Lane Ragged School, St Giles

In the 18th century, there was no such thing as free education.  Some charitable schools existed, but very few.  By the 19th century, Victorian philanthropists started to show concern about the neglected poor and more ragged schools opened, so called because most of the children dressed in rags and few had shoes.

My 4 x great uncle Charles Corben, owner of the carriage works at 30 Great Queen Street, was the treasurer of the Charles Street, Drury Lane ragged school and soup kitchen.  This establishment educated 400 children in one of the most deprived areas of London.  Many of the children did not attend during winter for want of clothing.  The school relied upon charitable donations and appeals were regularly made through newspaper columns.

And thank goodness altruistic men like Charles Corben existed.  Whilst researching my maternal family tree, I recently discovered that my relative Samuel Laycock also lived in St Giles .  A labourer by trade and presumably poor, he lived at 14 Queen St with four other families comprising a total of 18 people.  Three of his seven children were named as ‘ragged scholars’ in the 1851 census.  They may well have gone to The Charles Street ragged school.  The three children who attended the ragged school were Eliza, Ann Celia and John Laycock.  Ann and Eliza both married and lived to 86 and 91 respectively.  John Laycock benefited from his education and became a printer’s pressman, an occupation he remained in all his life.

September 8, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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Samuel Fuller, Mayflower passenger

Samuel Fuller was a doctor and church deacon.  Born in Redenhall, Norfolk 20 Jan 1580, he was one of the pilgrims who formed the colony at Plymouth, Massachusetts.   Travelling aboard The Mayflower with his servant William Button, he was one of 41 men to sign the Mayflower Compact.

It would be fabulous to claim a genetic ancestry from Samuel Fuller but unfortunately I can’t although I did find a connection to him by marriage whilst wading through the wills of my ancestors in Redenhall.

I have a few gaps left to plug, but it is my belief that my East Anglian Corbens are descended from the Redenhall Corbyn’s.  I have transcribed a number of Corbyn wills over the years. Two of these wills refer to members of the Fuller family of Redenhall.

My 13 x great Uncle John Corbyn left a will in Redenhall in 1540 in which he referred to John Fuller, grandfather of Samuel Fuller.  John Fuller senior was described as the ‘bellechilde’ of John Corbyn as was his brother William and other members of the Fuller family.  Although I can’t find a definitive explanation of the term “bellechilde” I am reasonably sure that it means godchild.

John Corbyn left many legacies.  Some gifts were left to John Fuller including 5 kine that were in the possession of John’s father William Fuller.   There were also several legacies to John Corbyn’s nephew Richard Corbyn.

Richard Corbyn left his own will when he died in Harleston in 1589.  Richard had 9 children and left legacies to each of them.  His daughter Frances, born about 1553 is named in the will as ‘Frances my daughter now the wife of Robert Fuller.’  One of the witnesses at the bottom of the will is Robert Fuller butcher.  Both Samuel Fuller and his brother Edward were children of Robert Fuller and his first wife Sarah Dunckthorne.  Sometime after Sarah died in 1584, and before 1586 when Sarah Fuller daughter of Robert and Frances was born, Robert married Frances Corbyn.

So I can’t claim direct descendancy from Samuel Fuller or his brother Edward who was also on board the Mayflower but at least I have a genetic connection to their step mother Frances.  And that’s probably the closest I will ever get to have a Mayflower ancestor!

 

September 5, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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Sydney Leonard Bird – Steward New Zealand Shipping Line

1897 – 1938

My grandfather Sydney Leonard Bird was born in Homerton in 1897. He served in the Royal Artillery during World War I and married my grandmother Lily Fairweather in 1928. He worked in the Merchant Navy until his death in 1938.

We know for sure that he served as a steward aboard New Zealand Shipping Company vessels RMS Remeura and MV Rangitata. He may have also served aboard the Rangitki. However, the hat badge in the above photograph does not look like the NZSC hat badge.

Our family album contains postcards of two MacIver line ships, the Lombardy and the Sicily. This line went into liquidation in 1931/1932 and the two vessels were transferred to the Royal Mail Line. We don’t know whether he served aboard these vessels – perhaps the hat badge relates to those lines?

If anyone reading this article is able to identify the hat badge, it would be fascinating to know more. Maritime genealogy is most definitely not my strong point so perhaps someone more experienced in this field would know if it’s easy (or even possible) to obtain crew lists for the Remeura and Rangitata?

September 4, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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John Corben of Sea Palling

Deciding what  image to use on my new website was not completely straightforward.  After some thought I settled for the gravestone of my great (x5) grandfather John Corben.

This photograph invokes happy memories of 15 years of ancestor hunting.  It was taken during a beautiful day at Sea Palling in Norfolk.  That year we decided on a UK holiday with the intention of combining it with some genealogy research.  At least I did.  The other members of my family rolled their eyes and went along with it as usual.

We drove into Sea Palling and had a pleasant lunch in the Old Hall Inn.  Then we wandered up to the churchyard of St Margaret of Antioch where I found to my great satisfaction, a completely readable tombstone for my ancestor.

John Corben was born in Bridgham Norfolk in 1759.  He married Sarah Moore in Cromer in 1787.  They moved to Waxham in 1789.  The Norwich Mercury records him as a gamekeeper in the employ of Sir G H Grograve Bt.  in 1801.

Sarah Corben gave birth to 9 children but only six survived to adulthood.  Her daughter Mary was born in 1799 but she only lived for a few weeks.  In 1804 her youngest children, twins Mary & George were born.  Mary survived but George died aged 5 months in 1805.  Sarah’s 15 year old son William tragically drowned the same year while bathing in the sea.  John, Sarah, George & William share the same grave.

John Corben died suddenly in 1815 leaving a brief will in which he left all his assets to his wife Sarah.  Fortunately Sarah left a far more comprehensive will when she died in Sea Palling in 1850.  This will proved beyond doubt that John, George & Charles Corben of London were her children.

Sarah was 92 years old when she died.  The majority of her life was spent in Sea Palling.  Having visited it I can easily see why she remained there.

• John Corben & Sarah Moore Click the link below:

 • More on Sea Palling:  [subscribe2]

 

September 3, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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Murder & Suicide in Great Waldingfield – March 1881

When Joshua Bowers left for work in March 1881, he did not expect to be summoned home to be told that his second wife had taken her life and murdered two of their children.  The day began like any other with Joshua walking to the farm of J Walter Hills where he was employed as a horseman. Around midday he was called back to the village to be told the awful news.

Born in Great Waldingfield, Suffolk in 1836, Joshua was the son of Peter Bowers, an agricultural labourer. He married his first wife, Emma Bird in 1859 and they moved to Upsher Green a small hamlet of red brick houses just outside the village. Their first child Henry Bird Bowers was born in 1859 and his brother Phillip Edmund Bowers followed shortly after in 1861. In 1863 Emma gave birth to her third and last child Elizabeth Sarah Bowers. The little girl died after a week and was buried on 24th March 1863. A week later Emma also died aged just 24 years.

With two small children to take care of, Joshua did not spend long looking for another partner and by May of 1864 he had married Susannah King, another resident of Great Waldingfield.

Their union produced six children, two boys and four girls. They lived together with the sons from Joshua’s previous marriage. Susannah’s health had been poor since the birth of her daughter Laura in 1880. She was both weak in body and prone to severe bouts of depression which, if treated today, might be diagnosed as post natal depression.

On Saturday 26th March 1881, Joshua Bowers left the house at about 9 o’clock to go to work. He was joined by his sons while his four daughters stayed at home with his wife. She had been complaining of a pain in her head and was lying upstairs in bed when he left.

The previous month, Susannah voluntarily admitted herself to St Leonard’s hospital in Sudbury. She had only recently come home. Her mother, Sarah King had cared for her since her return. Sarah was at the house that morning but left to collect her parochial relief just after Joshua departed. Susannah remained upstairs with the three younger girls while the eldest Elizabeth aged 13, scrubbed the floor downstairs.

Shortly after her grandmother left, Elizabeth was interrupted by her sister, 7 year old Ruth. Susannah had asked Ruth to fetch a razor to trim her corns. Elizabeth refused to let her younger sister have the razor so her mother came downstairs to collect it herself. Unconcerned, Elizabeth carried on with her chores. Moments later she heard a piercing scream coming from the upstairs bedroom.

She rushed upstairs to see two of her sisters covered in blood with their throats cut. Her mother was standing over the baby with the open razor, ready to cut its throat. Elizabeth tried to take the razor from her mother and her hands were badly cut in the struggle. She pleaded with her mother to stop but Susannah just said “Leave me alone, Lizzie”. Then she cut the throat of Laura, the youngest child. She turned towards Elizabeth who jumped from the top to the bottom of the stairs in fright.

Elizabeth’s screams alerted the next door neighbour, Mrs Carter, who ran upstairs and into the bedroom where she saw the three children with their throats cut. Susannah Bowers was still alive and walked towards Mrs Carter with her arms outstretched. Mrs Carter ran downstairs as fast as she could and ran straight into the path of another neighbour, Thomas Day, a beer house keeper.

By the time Day arrived upstairs, Susannah Bowers had cut her own throat and was dead on the bed beside her children.

Although two of the children were lifeless, Ruth Bowers was still mobile and required urgent medical attention. Mr Joseph Horsford, a surgeon of Long Melford was called and he tended to Ruth who was eventually saved. Nothing could be done for the other children who had died quickly. Susannah had cut both the trachea and jugular veins of baby Laura so her death was virtually instantaneous. The left hand jugular vein of four year old Emily was still intact so she may have lived for two or three minutes.

An inquest was held on Monday 28th March 1881 at Thomas Day’s Beer house in Great Waldingfield. It ruled the deaths of the children as “wilful murder by the mother”. A second inquest was held immediately afterwards in front of the same jury to decide on the cause of death for Susannah Bowers. The jury returned a verdict of “Temporary insanity”.

By the time of the 1881 census on 3rd April 1881, the surviving members of the family were living apart. Joshua was still living in the same cottage at Upsher Green with his eldest son Henry and his injured daughter Ruth. The other three remaining children from his marriage to Susannah King were staying with different relatives within the village. Elizabeth, who had been so brave during both the killings and as principle witness at the inquest, was living with her Uncle James Bird and Aunt Mary (nee Bowers).

On the night of the census, Phillip Edmund Bowers, second eldest son of Joshua from his marriage to Emma Bird was living with his grandparents George and Elizabeth Bird. His aunt, recently widowed Anna Maria Gallant, was also staying with her parents George and Elizabeth. Once again Joshua Bowers selected a new partner quickly and by May 1882 Anna Maria had given birth to the first of five children that she had by Joshua. Registered in the 1891 & 1901 census as his housekeeper they applied to the local vicar to marry. Under the 1835 Marriage Act it was against the law for a man to marry his deceased wife’s sister so the vicar refused the marriage and entered his decision into the parish records where it can be read today.

Joshua and Anna Maria lived together as man and wife until her death in 1902. He died in 1914 at the age of 78. Frances Ruth Bower survived her ordeal and married John Butcher in 1893. She died in 1958 at the ripe old age of 85 despite her earlier trauma. For Elizabeth Bowers, the memory of the loss of her mother and two younger sisters never left her. In 1888 she married Albert Edmund Day at Great Waldingfield. Her eldest daughter was born shortly after. She was christened Emily Laura Susannah Day.

To find out more about about this family, follow the link below

Joshua Bowers

September 1, 2012
by Jacqui Beard
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Welcome to the New Look Website

Welcome to my new look website. It’s been a long time coming and I have been avoiding it for many years due to my rather limited website building skills. Finally, after a 36 hour period of intense activity and very little sleep, the new site is born. It has been a steep learning curve and there will be many changes over the coming days so please bear with me.

I use Family Historian for my data. Looking at the stats this morning, I find I have 34,498 individuals on my database. That’s a lot of research and I have to wonder whether it has become more of an obsession than a hobby.

I just can’t help collecting other people’s ancestors, or linking whole villages of people together via marriages. So a few months ago, I started to prune the database. Anyone not genetically registered to me is being ruthlessly deleted. The only exceptions to this are individuals collected from the fifteenth & sixteenth centuries. I have done an awful lot of research using wills in my eternal quest to find more information at the top of the family trees. This hard won information will remain on the website whether the individuals are genetically related to me or not.

Finally, this blog is an acknowledgement of all the footwork and the many years of primary research by my father John Bird who is responsible for much of the Fairweather and Bird information. Similarly my Uncle Martin Dennis has carried out the majority of the Dennis research. Corben’s are my speciality.

Jacqui B
Cheltenham 2012

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